Expressive Arts Books

Explore books recommended and/or written by members of the Expressive Arts Facilitation Group on FB.

 

If you would like to recommend your favourite book for Expressive Arts Facilitators please email me at: shelley@expressiveartworkshops.com


Guided Drawing is a sensorimotor, body-focused, trauma-informed art therapy approach. It is not necessarily concerned with an image-making process, but support the awareness of body memories. While these memories are always biographical, the therapy itself is not symptom-oriented. Not the specific problem or crisis becomes the focal point, but the option to new answers and solutions as they are embedded in the body's felt sense. Such sensorimotor achievements are remembered similar to learning how to swim or ride a bike. They are lasting achievements that can transform even early infant developmental set-backs; they assist in ending an active response to traumatic experiences. They allow us to rewrite our biography towards a more authentic, alive sense of self. (View book HERE)


The Art of Dreaming stands apart from all other dream books in that it invites readers to work with their dreams in whatever medium is most natural and beneficial to them. For some readers that might in fact be writing or talking, but for others it might be drawing or painting or working in clay or dancing or dramatizing or recreating movement or maskmaking or working in multimedia or creating poetry. 

 

(View book HERE)


The large format, leather-bound volume of The Red Book Hours complements the facsimile edition and English-language translation of The Red Book, published in 2009, and draws out insights into Jung's affinity with art as a means of personal insight. Psychologist and multimedia artist Jill Mellick documents copious research into Jung's choices regarding media and technique and his careful design of environments in which he could experience creative processes and allow unconscious content to flow forth. Her unlikely journey includes explorations of memory, serendipity, and science. A stunning interplay of texts and images includes magnifications of the wildly colorful and intricately detailed sketches from The Red Book and a selection of Jung's own pigments, never seen until now, The Red Book Hours presents a more comprehensive picture than ever before of the foundational psychoanalyst's experience and expression of his rich inner world. (View Book HERE)


This is the first book ever to be published on arts use in social work. Bringing together theoretical connections between arts and social work, and with practice examples of arts in micro and macro social work practice from around the world, the book aims to inspire the reader with new ideas. It provides specific skills, defines what is social rather than fine or projective art use, and explains the theoretical connection between art and social work. It has chapters from all over the world, showing how arts are adjusted to different cultural contexts.

 

(View Book HERE)


Using theory and step-by-step exercises, dancer and clinical counselor Dr. Jamie Marich expertly guides you through seven primary elements of mindfulness in motion: breath, sound, body, story, mind, spirit and fusion. By dancing through these seven elements, either in personal practice or in a group, you will be better able to:

 

~ Access your body’s own healing resources through informal dance

~ Realize the transformative power of your personal creativity

~ Strengthen your abilities to exercise non-judgment, patience, a sense of play, trust, acceptance and letting go

~ Practice mindfulness even if you have struggled with traditional sitting meditation

~ Share healing dances with others to build on your own strengths, resources and experiences. (View book HERE)


Newly updated and revised, this authoritative guide shows you how to use art therapy to guide yourself and others on a special path of personal growth, insight, and transformation. Cathy A. Malchiodi, a leading expert in the field, gives you step-by-step instructions for stimulating creativity and interpreting the resulting art pieces. This encouraging and effective method can help you and others recover from pain and become whole again.

 

(View Book HERE)


At forty-two, Joan Stanford―a busy mother, innkeeper―discovered, to her surprise and delight, a creative process for insight and healing that allowed even her, a self-proclaimed “non-artist,” to start making art. In The Art of Play, Stanford shares her journey through art and poetry as an example of how taking―or, more appropriately, making―time to pay attention to the imagery our daily lives presents to us can expand our awareness and joy, and she offers readers suggestions for how to do this for themselves, inviting them to embark on their own journey.

 

(View Book HERE)